Know Your Rights!

Landlords cannot refuse to rent to you because of who you are. It is against the law for landlords to reject you because of:

  • Your race or color.
  • The country you came from
  • Your religion.
  • Your sex
  • A physical disability.
  • Your family status, such as whether or not you are married.

There are some rules about how many people can occupy a rental unit, depending upon the number of bedrooms and the square feet.

If you feel you have been refused housing for any of these reasons, you can contact the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) by phone at 1.800.669.9777. Information is given in English and Spanish. Or go on line to http://portal.hud.gov/portal/page/portal/HUD

Obligations of the Landlord:

Landlords must keep the home or apartment that you rent safe and in good condition. If you have a problem:

  • First, talk with your landlord. Tell him or her what is wrong and that you want it fixed.
  • Next, write a letter to your landlord telling him or her what is wrong. Keep a copy for yourself.
  • Finally, call your local Housing Office. Most city or local governments have people who inspect houses for problems. Ask the inspector to visit and show him or her all the problems.

If your landlord does not fix the problems, you may be able to make a legal charge against him or her.

Know Your Rights!

Landlords cannot refuse to rent to you because of who you are. It is against the law for landlords to reject you because of:

  • Your race or color.
  • The country you came from
  • Your religion.
  • Your sex
  • A physical disability.
  • Your family status, such as whether or not you are married.

There are some rules about how many people can occupy a rental unit, depending upon the number of bedrooms and the square feet.

If you feel you have been refused housing for any of these reasons, you can contact the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) by phone at 1.800.669.9777. Information is given in English and Spanish. Or go on line to http://portal.hud.gov/portal/page/portal/HUD

Obligations of the Landlord:

Landlords must keep the home or apartment that you rent safe and in good condition. If you have a problem:

  • First, talk with your landlord. Tell him or her what is wrong and that you want it fixed.
  • Next, write a letter to your landlord telling him or her what is wrong. Keep a copy for yourself.
  • Finally, call your local Housing Office. Most city or local governments have people who inspect houses for problems. Ask the inspector to visit and show him or her all the problems.

If your landlord does not fix the problems, you may be able to make a legal charge against him or her.